Finding balance in small business

By DAWN BOOTH, Managing Editor of Connect Weekly

I’ve been a freelance journalist for well over a decade. Straight out of college, it wasn’t easy to land a job in my career field. I was living in Toronto after I graduated. Luckily, there were plenty of jobs available in the customer service industry.

So, I bartended in High Park. I worked as an usher at the Roger’s Centre and Air Canada Centre. I worked doing promotions for Frank’s Red Hot and Perrier water. At one time, I was working all of these jobs in the same time period – anything I could do to pay for the rent of a downtown Toronto condo… and even all that eventually wasn’t enough.

As I continued to seek out opportunities in the journalism field, I failed at finding a permanent position. Any available opportunity was only to freelance, and even some of those gigs paid little to nothing – $40 here, $20 there. But the pay didn’t stop me, it was the experience that was helping me maintain and practice my education.

It was when I moved to Fort McMurray that I landed my first-paid job as a full-time editor in a newsroom. Even then (and still to this day), I remained freelancing because I was able to practice my skills in a variety of different ways.

Last year, I started my own marketing and communications business. It was at perfect timing because I was pregnant with my third child. I was able to work at my own pace, in my own home, and gain extra income for my household.

I think this is how a lot of small businesses start out. People have a passion for something that they are skilled at and they decide to start something to call their own. In our community, we have many residents doing the same thing.

I think this is how a lot of small businesses start out. People have a passion for something that they are skilled at and they decide to start something to call their own. In our community, we have many residents doing the same thing.

In families, I often learn how one partner works in industry, while the other runs their own business. With our high childcare costs and mortgages, it makes sense that many decided to go this route instead of relying to survive on one income.

I’m proud to live in our community with people who work hard – in big industry and small business. As we celebrate Small Business Week from October 18 to 24, I invite everyone to take part because it’s the big and small that unites us all and keep us striving to balance the budget.

– Connect Weekly –