And they lived happily ever after, or did they?

Into the Woods – A play review (*Spoilers included*)

By SHARON HEADING, Connect Contributor

The cast of Into the Woods on-stage at Keyano Theatre. The last show ends on February 20 with a “Pay What You Can” admission fee to ensure everyone has the change to view theatrics in the Wood Buffalo community. Learn more at www.keynao.ca

The cast of Into the Woods on-stage at Keyano Theatre. The last show ends on February 20 with a “Pay What You Can” admission fee to ensure everyone has the change to view theatrics in the Wood Buffalo community. Learn more at www.keynao.ca

Once upon a time, James Lapine wrote a story about fairy tales, specifically he mashed together several timeless fairy tales and took them beyond their “Happily Ever After”. The whole idea of “be careful what you wish for” is a delightful one. What really does happen after the happy ending? Well, in this case, Paul Gilineau takes the Keyano Theatre Company on a delightful hike through the woods for the Into the Woods performance.

Part of the 4-Play Drama Series, the play centers on the childless Baker and his wife, who discover that there is a curse that can be lifted, if they bring four items to their next-door neighbour – the Witch.  The adventure begins as the four stories, related to the four desired items collide in the woods.

Except, wait… we are at Intermission. Admittedly, much of the audience was confused. By traditional theatre standards: we have a beginning, a middle, and an end. And this is where the real story begins.

Each character with an item needed to lift the curse heads into the woods on their own adventure. Jack (Emily Beauchesne) to sell his cow, Little Red riding Hood (Camryn Hannigan) to bring goodies to her grandma, Cinderella (Ashley Kendall) (returning from the Ball) and Rapunzel (Kelsea Frye) trapped in the tower. As each story unfolds, the plots converge and we come to our happy ending.

Except, wait… we are at Intermission. Admittedly, much of the audience was confused. By traditional theatre standards: we have a beginning, a middle, and an end. And this is where the real story begins.

We take that peak behind the curtain that glimpses into the future. Is it really a happily ever after? Well, that is for you to decide.

The second half, like the first, leaves you laughing (seriously those Princes were hysterical), crying (they knock people off at an alarming rate) and at times horrified (lots of fairy tale worthy death and destruction).

The play is great fun. An entertaining evening well worth the time. The set is very creative and the designer (Roger Schultz) does an amazing job of incorporating all of the stories, and yet keeps the design elements for each story strong and individual. Costumes are wonderful from Melissa Mitchell – right on point. I particularly loved the Wolf (Duane Aubin) and Little Red Riding Hood – the cigar for Red Riding Hood was an inspired detail.

It was great to see some new faces on the Keyano stage. I love to see our ensemble growing. Everyone did a fabulous job. A thumbs up for Jason Beck in his first Keyano stage performance. I hope to see him again. Emily owned Jack! Duane, he’s a charming wolf at heart. And Camryn, there was nothing little about his Red Riding Hood. And those princes (Seth Levine and Mark Armstrong), I am looking forward to seeing more of these delightful new and old faces. Who says the arts are not alive in Fort McMurray? Don’t miss this one folks. It is a bit long, but quite delightful.

– Connect Weekly –